Kahoot!

Last year, I was lucky enough to come across an amazing game-based learning program called Kahoot! This is a free, digital website that allows you to play interactive quizzes as a class. There are literally thousands of quizzes to choose from, or alternatively, you can make your own. Multiple choice questions appear on the big screen, and students select their answers on their devices. The fastest correct answers get the most points. Some of the benefits (from the Kahoot! website):

  • Stimulates collaboration and social learning.
  • Engages the heart, hand and mind for deeper pedagogical impact.
  • Zero setup time, no player accounts required and simple one-click gameplay.
  • Create your own Kahoots in minutes or choose from millions of public ones made by our global community.
  • Works on any device with an Internet connection, in any language, for any subject or age group
  • It’s free to create and play

I have developed some of my own quizzes and find that they are a great way to begin a new unit. For example, at the start of a recent Year 12 Shakespeare unit, I made a 10-question quiz to find out how much the students already knew about Shakespeare and his plays. If you’d like to use the quiz just click here (though you may need to have an account to access it). Another great resource is this great article called “6 Alternative Ways To Use Kahoot! in the Classroom and Beyond”.

At the end of quizzes, students enter feedback in real time about how much fun they had during the quiz. Students have a blast with this game and each time I use it in the classroom they usually demand, “One more round! One more round!” Hope you enjoy this excellent, free classroom resource!

A view of how the multiple-choice answers look on students' screens
A view of how the multiple-choice answers look on students’ screens
Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 2.08.38 AM
Ratings after the quiz – instant feedback!
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One thought on “Kahoot!

  1. I cried when I read that quote of his at the end!!! Great post. I’m sure his work would be insightful for social workers who work with youth, too.

    Like

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